Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Feb 4th, 2024 – Feb 10th, 2024 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Feb 4th, 2024 – Feb 10th, 2024

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Fuel Market News

The diesel market experienced spikes throughout the week, as the market closed $0.20 higher on Friday from its opening OPIS rack average of $3.48. Gasoline prices fluctuated upwards as prices rose $0.08 to end the week. Oil prices increased this week going from $72/barrel to $76/barrel. This price increase could likely be partly responsible for the uptick in diesel prices. As we approach March, fuel prices are likely to continue their price hike into Spring.

 

Reasons For Lower Prices:

Crude oil is trading below $80 for the fifth straight week at a current price of $76.21/barrel. $2.00 higher than last week, as oil prices trended upward for the second week straight.

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxes—a helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading at $76 per barrel compared to $72 last week and $89 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above and other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, use the links below for AAA & GasBuddy.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

January 2024 Fuel Market Recap 150 150 Star Oilco

January 2024 Fuel Market Recap

January 2024 Fuel Market Recap for Portland, Oregon

  • Stable oil prices: Unlike previous years, oil prices remained relatively stable in January 2024 globally, impacting local markets like Portland. This stability stemmed from:
    • Increased oil production from the Americas.
    • Weaker economic growth globally, leading to lower demand.
    • Ongoing geopolitical tensions with limited impact on supply chains.
  • Gradual price increase: Despite stability, experts predicted a gradual increase in fuel prices starting in March 2024

Review the January 2024 recap on the Fuel Market for the United States, As Well As Key Factors Affecting Fuel Prices and Predictions for February 2024, on our website.

The average price of a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline in Portland, Oregon, was $4.61 on November 30, 2023, up from $4.44 on November 1, 2023. This represents a 3.6% increase over the month.

January 2024 Fuel Market Recap for United States

Overall stability: January 2024 saw continued fuel price stability compared to December 2023.

Crude oil: Prices remained relatively stable compared to previous years, averaging around $75 per barrel.

Gasoline: Average retail price hovered around $3.30 per gallon, slightly lower than December 2023.

Diesel: Prices stayed consistent with December 2023, ranging from $3.70 to $3.90 per gallon.

Natural gas: Prices fluctuated throughout the month but ended within the same range as December 2023, around $2.50-$3.00 per MMBtu.

Key influencing factors

Stable global oil production: Increased production from the Americas balanced global demand.

Weaker global economic growth: Lowered demand for crude oil and refined products.

Geopolitical tensions: Although ongoing, their impact on oil supply chains was limited in January.

Seasonal demand: Winter weather in January did not reach extreme levels, impacting natural gas demand less than expected.

Regional variations:

Fuel prices can vary significantly between regions due to factors like taxes, transportation costs, and refinery capacity.

For specific regional variations, it’s crucial to consult resources like:

Local news reports: Articles mentioning fuel prices in your area.

Industry publications: Trade publications related to specific fuel types might offer regional reports.

Fuel delivery companies: Contacting local providers for localized insights and January-specific details.

Predictions for February 2024

While unexpected events like geopolitical shifts or extreme weather conditions can always influence fuel prices, it appears that most experts predict continued stability in crude oil prices throughout February, barring unforeseen events. This could translate to stable or slightly fluctuating fuel prices across the US. Some analysts foresee a gradual price increase starting in March 2024, which could potentially impact February prices to a minor extent.

Exploring Options for Sustainable Fuels

While gasoline and diesel remain dominant players, venturing into the world of alternative energy sources offers exciting possibilities.

Reduced Carbon Footprint

Biodiesel, derived from renewable resources like plants or used cooking oil, boasts a significantly lower carbon footprint compared to conventional diesel. Renewable energy sources like solar and wind power eliminate greenhouse gas emissions altogether, contributing to a cleaner planet.

Diversifying Your Fuel Mix

Dependence on a single fuel source presents vulnerability to price fluctuations and supply disruptions. Embracing alternative options fosters energy security by reducing reliance on fossil fuels and opening doors to diverse, domestic energy sources.

Long-Term Gains

While initial setup costs for renewable energy systems might be higher, long-term benefits outweigh them. Biodiesel can offer price parity with diesel in some regions, and renewable energy costs are steadily declining.

Start Small, Experiment, and Adapt

Gradually incorporate alternative fuels or renewable energy sources into your operations. Learn from experience and adjust your approach as needed.

Remember, the transition to a sustainable fuel future is an ongoing process. By exploring options like biodiesel and renewable energy, we can power our world responsibly, ensuring a more secure and environmentally friendly future for generations to come. Feel free to contact one of our fuel experts at Star Oilco to discuss how renewable fuels can benefit your operations.

JOIN THE FUEL MARKET REPORT NEWSLETTER FOR YOUR WEEKLY FILL OF UPDATES!

Name
Fuel Market Report: Jan 28th, 2024 – Feb 3rd, 2024 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Jan 28th, 2024 – Feb 3rd, 2024

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Fuel Market News

Fuel prices across the board had minor variance with no real significant impact on the market with price changes between $0.01-$0.03 for both gas and diesel. This is common for this time of year, as fuel prices hit their yearly lows and begin to rebound, gauging overall demand. Drivers are still enjoying relatively low fuel prices in February, but this won’t last for long as prices will likely begin to climb in March and onward into the spring season. Oil prices dropped significantly this week going from $78/barrel to $72/barrel. Although the market has yet to see any of this heavily affect prices at the pump.

 

Reasons For Lower Prices:

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxes—a helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading around $72 per barrel compared to $78 last week and $89 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

Every Question we have been asked about Renewable Diesel
Every Question We Have Been Asked About Renewable Diesel 700 700 Star Oilco

Every Question We Have Been Asked About Renewable Diesel

Renewable Diesel Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Every Question we have been asked about Renewable Diesel

What is renewable diesel?

Renewable diesel is a synthetic diesel fuel, known for it’s lower CO2 characteristics, typically seeing purity and real world performance response superior to petroleum diesel fuel.  Renewable diesel is a next generation hydrocarbon diesel biofuel made by either the Fischer-Tropsch or Hydrogenation processes.

Hydrogenated renewable diesel is made by taking fats, oils, and greases by use of a hydro-treater.  The biomass based oil or fat is cracked and reformed in the presence of hydrogen and  catalyst forming a hydrocarbon diesel molecule.

Fischer-Tropsch renewable diesel is used by converting any btu dense feedstock (wood waste, woody biomass, municipal garbage, coal, and an endless list of low value waste products into syngas, then converting this into a wax that is reformed into hydrocarbon diesel.

Can Renewable Diesel be used as Heating Oil?

Yes.  Renewable Diesel is a synthetic hydrocarbon diesel fuel.  It can be used interchangeably with petroleum diesel products of similar grade. Heating Oil is typically number 2 diesel which is the same specification as Dyed R99 Renewable Diesel (or blends of Renewable Diesel with petroleum diesel).   Star Oilco now offers R99 Heating Oil delivered in the Portland metro region area of Oregon.

Most modern oil heat appliances use a Becket Burner.  For more on heating fuel compatibility with oil furnaces and oil burning appliance please see “Alternative Fuels and Becket Burners” for more information.

Why do people use renewable diesel over petroleum diesel?

Fleet managers operating R99 Renewable Diesel report a lower mechanical cost of operation using the fuel.  Beyond the immediate benefit of R99 cutting CO2 emissions by half or more, fleets experience performance benefits from the fuel.  Anecdotally the big savings are seen the the performance of Tier 4 Emission systems on modern diesel seeing far less wear of the Diesel Particulate Filter system as well as far fewer regenerations of the system.  Additionally Renewable Diesel is a very clean and dry diesel fuel improving the storage stability, field operation, and general predictability of the fuel’s performance.

What is renewable diesel made of?

Renewable diesel can be made from a host of things, usually a low value waste product. The most common feedstock used currently is waste vegetable oil, wastes from animal rendering, and other biologically derived oils. Processes using bio-oils are following a Hydrogenation process to turn low value waste oils into high value diesel and jet fuel.

Chevron Renewable Energy Group and Diamond Green Diesel (Diamond Green is in a joint venture with Valero) are the largest producer of renewable diesel with their REG Ultra Clean Diesel product in the United States. Neste is the largest producer of renewable diesel internationally, with its “Neste My” product.  being the two largest producers of low CO2 bio-oil derived renewable diesel fuels.

Major petroleum refiners have also turned around existing petroleum refineries into Renewable Diesel Refineries to produce this in demand low CO2 fuel. HF Sinclair , Marathon, Phillips 66, and Montana Renewables. There are quite a few newer Renewable Diesel projects planned and in progress around the United States as well as in the Pacific Northwest.

Other refiners of renewable diesel (on a much smaller scale of production) are using a Fischer-Tropsch process with wood waste, sorted higher grade municipal garbage, and other high btu value carbon based waste products.  Many expect this to technology to be the future of all diesel and jet fuel refining turning refuse into fungible low carbon fuel.

What is renewable hydrocarbon diesel?

Renewable hydrocarbon diesel is a synthetic diesel fuel made from non-petroleum feedstocks like vegetable oil, animal fats, municipal waste, agricultural biomass, and woody biomass. It is characterized by having a low CO2 and renewable resource for its feedstock and is made without crude petroleum, coal, or natural gas as a direct feedstock input in the refining process.

How do they make renewable diesel?

Renewable diesel is made by several processes. If you are buying renewable diesel, it is probably from a Hydrogenation process used by Renewable Energy Group and Neste for their products. Other smaller volume producers are using a Fischer-Tropsch process or Fast Pyrolysis. Both processes involve taking energy dense molecules, cracking those molecules under heat and pressure, then reforming them in the presence of a catalyst and added hydrogen, which forms a renewable diesel molecule.

Is renewable diesel a lower carbon fuel compared to petroleum diesel?

Yes, to this point all renewable diesel made from renewable feedstocks have appeared to be a lower CO2 fuel compared to petroleum diesels. The California Air Research Board in particular has done research on this in depth.

The low CO2 lifecycle emissions of Renewable Diesel also is tracked closely and supervised by California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Washington’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard, and Oregon’s Clean Fuels Program. The highest value markets for low CO2 fuels in the United States are California and Oregon, which both have mechanisms that track and price the CO2 intensity of diesel fuels as well as the sustainable lower CO2 substitutes and blend-stocks that can go in those diesels. They track, rate, and determine the carbon intensity of the fuels providing a neutral and scientifically defensible number for CO2 reduction.

Is renewable diesel available in Oregon?

Renewable diesel is readily available for delivery from Star Oilco throughout the Pacific Northwest via 10,000 gallon volumes of bulk delivery.   Star Oilco is also offering bulk delivery of any size and mobile onsite fueling service within 100 miles of the Portland, Oregon market.

Star Oilco has R99 Renewable Diesel available with a Star Oilco CFN Cardlock card in Portland, Oregon.

What is the difference between biodiesel and renewable diesel?

Biodiesel and renewable diesel are very different fuels made with very different processes. In a nutshell, biodiesel is made with a simple chemical reaction that turns vegetable and animal fats into fuel. Renewable diesel is made from far more complicated process where vegetable and animal fats (as well as other feedstocks) are cracked on a molecular level and built back into synthetic diesel fuel.

What is the difference between renewable diesel and Sustainable Aviation Fuel?

The difference between the fuels is the specific gravity and general specification for what the fuel is used for. Jet fuel, or Sustainable Aviation Fuel, and on-road diesel fuel are different fuels and therefore have different specifications. Renewable diesel is typically referring to a #2 diesel specification for on road diesel use.

Sustainable Aviation Fuel or “SAF” is typically referring to “Jet A” or “JP8” jet fuel specification for fuel. This is a #1 diesel range fuel with use and handling requirements that are far more stringent than for on-road or off-road diesel fuels. Renewable jet fuel can be used as a kerosene or #1 diesel fuel but renewable diesel cannot be used as a jet fuel.

Where do I buy renewable diesel in Oregon or Washington?

Renewable Diesel is currently available for bulk delivery and mobile onsite fueling. It will soon be offered at commercial cardlock in the Portland area. It is being sold as R99 and as Ultra Clean Diesel, which is a mixture of biodiesel, renewable diesel, and petroleum diesel.

What is R99?

R99 stands for 99% renewable diesel and 1% petroleum diesel.  Federal rules over alternative diesel fuels made fuels requires that manufacturers of non-petroleum derived diesel fuels must blend a minimum 1% petroleum with the fuel to generate a Renewable Industry Number or “RIN” under the US Federal Renewable Fuel Standard. Additionally there are other incentives that require a “blender of record” to receive these tax credits.

Is renewable diesel being made in Oregon?

As of Spring 2022, renewable diesel is not being manufactured in Oregon. There is a major projects underway, Next Renewable Fuels in Port Westward, Oregon.

What is renewable diesel made from?

Renewable diesel can be made from many energy dense carbon based material.  By volume of produced product sold in the United States, vegetable oils and animal fat-based wastes are the most common feedstock. Woody biomass, agricultural wastes, and sorted municipal wastes are also sources for renewable diesel production.

Is renewable diesel made from palm oil?

Palm oil can be used as a feedstock for renewable diesel. There are producers who use palm oil as a feedstock. In the United States, feedstocks and carbon intensity are tracked closely under both Oregon and California’s fuel programs.  You can determine if a supplier is using palm oil as a feedstock through these regulated pathways.

How much does renewable diesel cost?

This is a tough question to answer given there are several markets intersecting.  From the feedstocks to the market demand for the finished product as well as both California and Oregon’s Clean Fuel Standards which place a price on the CO2 intensity of the fuel which reduces the cost of the fuel if consumed in Oregon and California.

It has consistently been trending between the same cost and over $1 a gallon higher than petroleum diesel depending on the state, you buy renewable diesel in. In California, renewable diesel is very close to petroleum diesel depending on the value of CO2 credits for lower-carbon fuels. In Oregon, it has consistently been between $.05 to $.80 a gallon higher than diesel also depending on the value of CO2 abatement associated with the fuel and what these carbon credits are trading for.

When petroleum diesel costs are high Renewable Diesel tends to be more competitive with petroleum diesel.  When petroleum diesel is below $3 a gallon the cost of Renewable Diesel by comparison is usually higher unless CO2 credits are in higher than normal demand for Clean Fuels Program demands.

Can you mix petroleum diesel and renewable diesel?

Yes. Renewable diesel and petroleum diesel can be blended in any mixture without worry. They are drop-in substitutes for each other in your fleet’s use.  Renewable Diesel is a drop-in fuel. It is a hydrocarbon diesel that will work mixed with diesel or biodiesel blends of petroleum diesel.

More questions coming… or if you would like to learn more contact us.

Contact Form

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Fuel Market Report: Jan 21st, 2024 – Jan 27th, 2024 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Jan 21st, 2024 – Jan 27th, 2024

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

Fuel Market News

Pump prices varied throughout the week, spiking in the middle of the week and coming back towards the end of the week with no real significance to the overall market. OPIS wholesale rack averages increased over $0.05 across the board for E10, B5 & B20. While the national average increased by just $0.03. As most analysts predicted, the market is beginning to rise incrementally. Gas is still $0.40 cheaper than it was last year, which should stay consistent across the next few weeks. With spring on the horizon, it is likely that traveling trends will increase which will increase the demand for fuels in most regions. The market is still relatively low for the time being, making it a great time to fill up your bulk tanks before March.

 

 

Reasons For Lower Prices:

Crude oil is trading below $80 for the fourth straight week at a current price of $78.38/barrel. $5.00 higher than last week, as oil prices trended upward for the second week straight.

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxesa helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading around $78 per barrel compared to $73 last week and $89 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

Every question Star Oilco has been asked about heating oil 700 700 Star Oilco

Every question Star Oilco has been asked about heating oil

Heating Oil FAQ (and not so FAQ)

heating-oil-tank

When it gets cold in the Pacific Northwest, it’s time to take a look at some common questions we have been asked about Heating Oil.  If you don’t see an answer to a question you have, please feel free to call, email, or message Star Oilco and we will gladly answer. We especially welcome questions  that require research.

What is Heating Oil in Oregon?

Heating Oil in Oregon is diesel and can have a biodiesel blend as well.  Diesel fuel has several grades either #1 or #2 Diesel.  The number refers to the grade with #1 being called either “stove oil” or “Kerosene” as another term for it.  Typically when someone is requesting or talking about heating oil they are talking about #2 Diesel dyed red to denote there are no on-road fuel taxes associated with the fuel.

There are several types of oil furnaces.  The most common is a vaporizing burner.  These furnaces typically work by taking a liquid combustible fuel, vaporizing it into a fine mist through a fuel oil nozzle, and igniting that mist into fire. That fire heats either air or water for your home’s comfort.

Air furnaces usually move the air through a heat exchanger where a blower then moves air over the heat generated by your furnace, and finally the air is pushed through your home’s vents. 

Boilers and Water furnaces heat a tank of water which is then distributed several different ways to heat your home.  Either by moving hot water to radiators, radiant plumbing under your floor, or to a heat exchanger and blower which transfers the heat from the hot water into vents blown throughout your home. 

The parts leading up to the Burner of of an oil furnace system are simple. There is a tank to hold a reservoir of oil, a line from that tank (and sometimes a line back to it), a fuel filter, a fuel pump, and a vaporizing burner that combusts the heating oil into fire. Combustion of the fuel takes place in a fire box next to the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger takes on the heat of the flames to heat either air or water. In an oil furnace, the heat exchanger is assisted with a blower that pushes the hot air throughout your home to keep you comfy.

If you have an above or below ground heating oil tank you can confirm your fuel volume by the inches of fuel in the tank.  If you have an above ground tank there is probably a tank gauge that can tell you an approximate volume in the tank.  If you have an below ground tank you can confirm how many gallons are in the tank by putting  a measuring stick or tape-measure into the tank.

You will want to confirm the size of the tank you have. Your oil provider will probably have an idea of what size your tank is by looking or historic deliveries. Star Oilco has a tank chart which will help.  If you place a stick or tape measure into your tank and see how much fuel is in it you can compare that to a tank chart found on Star Oilco’s website.  When delivering fuel you can “stick” measure the tank before and after the delivery. Compare these volumes with the delivery and you can often figure out your tank size based on the before and after volume lining up with how much fuel filled your tank.

To view Star Oilco’s Tank Chart please click HERE. 

Home heating oil can be either a petroleum diesel fuel, bio-synthetic diesel fuel, or biodiesel fuel. In Oregon and Washington, home heating oil is typically ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel often containing between 5% and 20% biodiesel. Star Oilco’s standard home heating oil fuel is B5 dyed ultra-low sulfur diesel. Oregon mandates require that all diesel fuel sold contain a minimum 5% biodiesel. For that reason Star Oilco carries B5 or 5% biodiesel blends in our heating oil.

(NOTE: Kerosene sold by Star Oilco contains no biodiesel due to the reality that wick heaters cannot handle even a minute amount of biodiesel in them.) Star Oilco also carries a 20% biodiesel blend, called B20 Bioheat, for customers who want a cleaner burning low carbon fuel for their home.

Kerosene is a heating oil product that is capable of being picked up and fed consistently by a wick heater. Kerosene is a diesel product that is very similar to the fuel used for over the road trucks. The big difference is that kerosene is a “lighter end” distillate fuel, which means it has a lighter specific gravity. This lighter characteristic means that it also works better in certain systems like wick heaters, pressure washers, and pot burner stoves.

It depends on what type of system the kerosene heater is operating with. If you have a wick heater it will not work with heating oil. You will likely have to replace the wick to get it to work again as diesel will not readily drawn into the wick. Even if it does, it will burn far dirtier. If it is a pot burning system like a Toyostove or Monitor heater, then it will burn ultra low sulfur heating oil. Increased maintenance is to be expected on the pot burner, as there is a likelihood of more coking (crusty black soot build up) to occur inside that system.

Bio heating oil and bioheat refer to heating oil products with a blend of biodiesel in them. Typically bioheat is a blend between 5% to 20% biodiesel with ultra low sulfur diesel for a clean burning and low CO2 heating fuel.

For a really in-depth look at biodiesel used as a heating oil check out this article. 

Yes, heating oil will run in a diesel engine. Heating oil is diesel. Be aware though that on-road vehicles must only run clear diesel fuels. If caught using heating oil in an on-road vehicle in Oregon and Washington, the fines can run in the tens of thousands of dollars. Heating oil can also be dyed to signify it isn’t for on-road use. 

Also be aware that even many off-road pieces of equipment and generators need ultra low sulfur diesel to operate without very expensive maintenance. Heating oil can have low sulfur or even high sulfur contents that could cause real issues for modern clean diesel engines. Some consideration is needed prior to burning a fuel marked “heating oil” in a diesel engine.

Consult your furnace, stove, boiler or water heater’s factory recommended specification. Typically it’s Number 2 Diesel unless it is a stove pot or wick heated system. If you have a furnace or a boiler in your basement, you can assume it’s heating oil. Call a licensed and bonded heating oil furnace technician to tune up your furnace to confirm for sure. If you do not have one, Star Oilco can refer you to a number of reputable long-time firms who can help.

Heating oil additives are added to fuel in order to improve it’s long term storage and performance.  They are worth it and most reputable heating oil providers additize their fuel without an extra charge.  This is because most heating oil customers store their fuel for long periods of time.  If you are planning on storing heating oil for years you will need a fuel additive to keep that fuel in the quality needed for your furnace.

Star Oilco provides a premium diesel additive called Hydrotex PowerKleen to every gallon of heating oil we sell.  Beyond this stabilizers, if you are planning on storing fuel for years we recommend ValvTect Plus 6.  You will want to treat your fuel with a biocide like ValvTect Plus 6 to will kill any bacteria, yeast, algae, or other biological organism that can grow inside your heating oil tank.

For more on storing diesel or heating oil for long periods of time please read this article on long term fuel storage.

Heating oil smells like diesel. It is a diesel product and often, depending on location, it is the same as on-road diesel. It may be dyed to denote that it is an off-road fuel with a untaxed use. Heating oil is dyed red in the Pacific NW to show it is off-road diesel.

Heating Oil #2 is number 2 diesel or the standard diesel sold in most places for on-road diesel use. Heating Oil #2 is a slightly different specification than on-road diesel that allows for more sulfur. That is a big difference as far as the EPA is concerned. On-road and off-road vehicles in the U.S. are required to use ultra-low sulfur diesel. Heating oil systems can use low or high sulfur diesel fuels. Ultra low-sulfur diesel is the most common Heating Oil #2 fuel that is delivered by Star Oilco since it is a superior and cleaner burning fuel, in our opinion.

In the Pacific NW heating oil is ultra low sulfur diesel. Therefore, you can buy any diesel sold at a retail gas station, truckstop, farm supply or other liquid fuel seller.  Heating oil is dyed red to show that it is not taxed for on-road fuel use.  Other than that red dye, typical auto-diesel will work in your oil furnace if you need to supply it from a diesel can.

Heating Oil Gel Point:

In the Pacific NW we expect number 2 diesel heating oils to be operable beyond -10 degrees. The record cold weather in the Willamette Valley is above 0 degrees (recent decades 16 degrees was our record low in Portland). We do test and add additives to our fuels to ensure they meet this specification even if they contain 5% biodiesel blended into heating oil.

Kerosene Gel Point:

Kerosene fuels (Number 1 Diesel, Number 1 Stove Oil, and Kerosene labeled fuels) are expected to be good below -30 degrees and are designed to be used in high altitude applications. (Kerosene and jet fuels are often the same specification in the Pacific NW.)

B20+ Biodiesel Gel Point:

Biodiesel blends of B20 and above are assumed to be good to 20 degrees but if Star Oilco expects below-freezing weather, we highly recommend B5 as your delivered fuel. B99 biodiesel typically gels at 40 degrees, so it’s not a winter fuel unless you have a system designed to keep the fuel warm in the middle of winter.

“Oil Heat” or “Oil Fired” refers to a heating system reliant on burning heating oil. Typically this is by use of a vaporizing burner that takes the combustible liquid that is heating oil and vaporizes it through a nozzle into an igniter that causes it to burn.  This system burns the heating oil, creating a great deal of heat that can warm air, water, or both to heat a home or commercial space.

NOTE: IF HEATING OIL HAS BEEN INGESTED PLEASE SEE A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL.

Heating oil by itself is not dangerous or toxic if it come in contact with your skin.  It is easily washed off with soap and water.  A small amount of diesel spilled on the surface of the ground, typically will break down on it’s own in the presence of the environment.  A small amount spilled on concrete or asphalt can be cleaned up easily with dish soap and water. If your tank leaks and heating oil is soaked below ground this will not break down easily and will take professional help to treat.

The exhaust from heating oil systems contains carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide as well as particulates.  Heating oil and other diesel exhausts are very dangerous and toxic and should be avoided.  Do not allow exhausts of any kind to collect in an enclosed space.

Heating Oil’s vapor point (the temperature it turns to vapor and evaporates) is around 140 degrees Fahrenheit.  Heating oil ignites at 160 degrees.  Typically in the Pacific NW the temperature (especially outside) is well below the vapor and flash point of diesel fuels including heating oil and kerosene. If spilled it will not usually evaporate. You can clean heating oil and diesel up with regular dish soap and water.

Heating oil ignites at 160 degrees.  So unless the temperature is that high an explosion is not a risk.  Fire Code regulating heating oil tanks and placement takes this concern into account.  So typically except in extreme scenarios heating oil vapor does not pose an explosion risk.

If you drop a match into a cup of heating oil at room temperature it will go out.  If you hold a match to the surface of the heating oil in that cup the flame will get large and bright but the heating oil itself will not ignite.  Heating oil needs to be vaporized before it will ignite. It is a combustible fuel so it must be in a vapor form to light.  The vaporizing nozzle of your heating oil furnace turns diesel into a vapor mist easily ignitable.

Yes, heating oil can go bad. If you are planning to store heating oil for longer than a year, you should use a diesel additive that stabilizes fuel for long term storage. If you are storing the fuel as a back-up where you might go years without using it, you should also consider adding a biocide to ensure nothing grows in your tank. The two biggest threats to your fuel staying in specification are water and biological growth. Biological growth occurs inside the water that can collect in your tank bottom naturally through condensation over time.

Star Oilco treats 100% of our dyed fuels with Hydrotex Powerkleen to ensure that it is stable for storage for over a year. If you need to store it longer than that, we further recommend adding a desiccant breather to scrub moisture out of the air when your tank breaths, which protects it from additional water.

For more on additizing your heating oil for long term storage please follow THIS link.

Yes, heating oil tanks properly installed outside are perfectly safe and capable of ensuring your fuel stays clean and dry.

Yes, at several different levels. With residential use, there are local jurisdictions’ building permit requirements for installation and safety. With commercial use, there is the same building permit regulation and usually an added level of Fire Marshall sign-off for siting of any tanks. In rural areas, regulations are different if the tank is associated with an agricultural use.

In Oregon and Washington, a 90 day temporary tank for construction purposes (to move from one tank to another in a formal process) is usually allowed, but you should ensure the temporary tank is a double wall tank and is in a safe place. If your tank leaks (or even if there is a suspicion of a leak), the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and Washington Department of Ecology have an involved process to close out a leaking oil tank.  

Yes, you need to ensure you maintain your oil furnace. Star Oilco recommends getting a tune up annually or at least every other year.  If you are seeking a referral to a HVAC company that specializes in oil heat, call Star Oilco’s office 503-283-1256 and ask for a list of qualified license and bonded companies we recommend. You also want to check your oil furnace for water annually. Star Oilco can stick your tank for water at no charge upon request with a fuel delivery.

One of the great benefits of oil heat is that oil furnaces are known to last for over fifty years if maintained properly. Natural gas and propane furnaces typically wear out every ten to twenty years dependent on their construction. The primary wear consideration on any furnace is the heat exchanger. The heavy steel part takes the flame of burning fuel, transmits this heat to the air, and is then pushed to heat your home. Oil furnaces must be tuned up every year or two to ensure the heat exchanger is cleaned.

If you do not service the heat exchanger, it will collect soot. Soot insulates the heat exchanger unevenly and causes wear that will eventually lead to a crack. If a heat exchanger is cracked, the furnace is no longer safe to operate. Additionally, an annual tune-up will pay for itself by ensuring your furnace is burning at peak efficiency. You will want to replace your furnace air filter regularly on an annual basis.

Tuning your furnace annually or every other year is highly recommended. Adjusting the fuel air mixture for the most efficient combustion goes a long way to ensure you use as little heating oil as possible. Star Oilco has witnessed fifty and even seventy year oil furnaces operate at modern efficiencies when maintained regularly over their lives. Today, there are a host of high efficiency oil furnaces manufactured and supported to reduce your cost of fuel.  Additionally, confirming the envelope of your home is not drafty or needlessly wasting heat can go a long way in reducing your heating expenses.

The price of heating oil fluctuates frequently due to market conditions. Comparison shopping is your best way to ensure you pay the best possible price. One web based tool we have heard customers like to use to save time while shopping for heating oil is Fuelwonk.com.  It is free and easy to use.

Even though the cost of fuel is dependent on the market and out of our control, there are best practices to reduce the amount of oil you’ll need. The temperature you keep your house will affect how much oil you go through. Keeping your temperature higher will lead to more oil burned during the winter months. How insulated your home is will also affect the amount of oil you burn. Having poor insulation will result in having your furnace running hotter for longer periods of time, increasing fuel use. Annual maintenance of your furnace will keep your furnace operating at top efficiencies. Having a well working and operating furnace will keep costs down by not wasting oil on an underperforming unit.

Star Oilco also has a number of discounts and programs for price reduction. We offer $.05/gallon veteran and senior citizen discount. We frequently have discounts on Google and our social media pages so make sure to check those out. Mention where you saw it to receive the discount.

Heating oil customers at Star Oilco have the opportunity to enroll in our Equal Pay program. The program allows you to make equal monthly payments on future heating oil deliveries. As an Equal Pay customer, you will receive a discount of .20 cents per gallon on all heating oil deliveries. We also have an Autofill program which dictates you receive our best price as well as automatic deliveries. You don’t have to keep track of your fuel or when you need a delivery. We do the work for you!

If you do not like our price and someone else is cheaper let us know.  We will match their price.

Heating Oil is a modern fuel that uses today’s heating oils and biofuels.  The investments in research and development for heating oil furnace by the National Oil Research Alliance to use a wider variety of biofuels in higher lower CO2 blends have kept heating oil relevant in many applications.  As a heating fuel, it’s use will become more rural than urban rather than a phase out. As it is today, the use of heating oil will be used where natural gas is not available especially if the temperatures get below zero. Urban adoption of natural gas has increased, as it’s cheaper than heating oil due to increased fracking development of petroleum.

Star Oilco uses a Degree Day system for our customers on Automatic Keep-Full Service.  We fill your tank before it needs it automatically. A statistical regression analysis correlates your typical use of heating oil in your home and the weather.  Our systems will track your usual fuel usage and we automatically schedule delivery to keep your tank full.

The technical term “BTUs” refers to “British Thermal Units” which is a measure of energy content of a fuel. The energy content of diesel fuels can vary slightly by regions and specifications of those regions.  In the Pacific Northwest, heating oil is typically Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel with a blend of biodiesel content. This can range from 5% to 20% biodiesel added to the fuel. This means the exact BTU measured for a gallon of heating oil an slightly vary.

Source: US Alternative Fuel Data Center Fuel Properties Comparisons
Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel: 128,488 BTUs to 138,490 BTUs per gallon.
B5 Biodiesel is presumed to be about the same BTUs as ULS Diesel.
B100 Biodiesel: 119,550 BTUs to 127,960 BTUs per gallon.
B20 Biodiesel: 126,700 BTUs to 136,384 BTUs per gallon.

Get A Heating Oil Quote Today

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Fuel Market Report: Jan 14th, 2023 – Jan 20th, 2023 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Jan 14th, 2023 – Jan 20th, 2023

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Fuel Market News

The wholesale market experienced slight increases for both gas and diesel while the retail market saw a drop of over $0.10 for both gas and diesel in Washington & Oregon. Drivers have enjoyed relatively low fuel prices the past two months but should not expect this to continue, as prices will trend upwards towards the end of February. With winter storms across the nation, some refineries may have slowed activity which could lead to higher fuel prices in certain regions.

 

Crude oil is trading below $75 for the fifth straight week at a current price of $73.16/barrel. $.60 higher than it was last week, as oil prices trended upward for the first time in weeks.

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxesa helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading around $73 per barrel compared to $71 last week and $89 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

Fuel Market Report: Jan 7th, 2023 – Jan 13th, 2023 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Jan 7th, 2023 – Jan 13th, 2023

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Fuel Market News

Despite predictions of the market “bottoming out” concerning price variances, the wholesale market continued to drop this week, experiencing a simultaneous decrease of $0.10 for diesel and gasoline. Winter storms across multiple regions along with post-holiday travel declines are some of the largest contributions to the current decreased demand for fuel. “The drop in demand along with an increase in gasoline supplies is leading to decreases at the pumps,” says AAA public affairs director. We will likely begin to see an increased price for diesel over the coming months into March.

 

Crude oil is trading below $75 for the fourth straight week at a current price of $72.74/barrel. $1.20 higher than it was last week, as oil prices trended upward for the first time in weeks.

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxes—a helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading around $72 per barrel compared to $74 last week and $91 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

Fuel Market Report: Dec 31st, 2023 – Jan 6th, 2023 150 150 Star Oilco

Fuel Market Report: Dec 31st, 2023 – Jan 6th, 2023

fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco
fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Oregon Fuel Price Variance

fuel-market-report-star-oilco

Fuel Market News

The first week of January brought lower fuel prices for wholesale buyers. Wholesale fuel prices dropped $0.10 for gasoline and $0.07 for diesel, while the retail market was mostly unchanged, dropping just $0.01 for both gas and diesel. Prices should remain at these levels for the foreseeable future, as crude oil is still hovering just above $70/barrel with no major production cuts being announced for the months ahead.

Reasons For Lower Prices:

  • Oil prices under $71, currently $70/barrel
  • Winter Fuel Blend

Crude oil is trading below $73 for the fourth straight week at a current price of $70.49/barrel. $0.04 lower than it was last week, as trends continue downwards. A major factor in why fuel prices have continued to drop.

Crude oil is the main ingredient for gasoline and diesel. Per AAA, on average about 50% of what you pay at the pump is the price of crude oil, breaking down as 25% refining, 11% distribution & marketing, and 14% taxes—a helpful breakdown for consumers wondering why they are paying the prices that they pay. Crude Oil is trading around $72 per barrel compared to $74 last week and $91 a year ago.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

It’s essential to recognize that fuel prices result from a complex interplay of the factors mentioned above in addition to other factors regionally. Additionally, prices may vary by specific regions within Oregon and Washington. For the most precise and up-to-date information on fuel prices and the causes for these price changes within your area, it is advisable to consult local news outlets, government energy agencies, or industry reports.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Star Oilco and speak to one of our fuel market advisors to discuss how the market can impact your business.

For other news in the fuel market:

https://gasprices.aaa.com/?state=OR

Join the Fuel Market Report newsletter for your weekly fill of updates!

fuel-taxes-portland-or-star-oilco
Benefits of Using Cardlock Fuel Cards 829 1024 Star Oilco

Benefits of Using Cardlock Fuel Cards

Cardlock accounts offer a multitude of benefits for businesses, particularly those with fleets of vehicles that require regular fueling. Benefits to using cardlock for your business include reducing fuel costs, improving fuel management, reducing potential fraud risks, creating more convenience and efficiencies and allowing a more enhanced tax compliance.  

  1. Reduced Fuel Costs:
    Cardlock accounts often provide businesses with access to discounted fuel prices, which can lead to significant savings over time. Additionally, cardlock accounts can help businesses track fuel usage and identify areas where they can reduce fuel consumption.

  2.  Improved Fuel Management:
    Cardlock accounts provide businesses with detailed fuel usage data, which can be used to track individual driver behavior, identify unauthorized fuel usage, and optimize fuel routing. This data can also be used to negotiate better fuel rates with suppliers.
  3. Reduced Fraud Risk:
    Cardlock accounts offer multiple security features, such as PIN numbers, purchase limits, and real-time transaction monitoring, which can help prevent unauthorized fuel usage and fraud.
  4. Convenience and Efficiency:
    Cardlock accounts allow businesses to refuel their vehicles quickly and efficiently, without the need for cash or credit card transactions. This can help reduce downtime and improve productivity.
  5. Enhanced Tax Compliance:
    Cardlock accounts provide businesses with detailed fuel usage records, which can be helpful for tax reporting and compliance purposes.
     

Meet Maria…

Maria’s trucking company was struggling. Juggling invoices from dozens of gas stations, monitoring driver fuel spends, and fighting fraudulent charges all felt like navigating a minefield. The chaos ate into Maria’s bottom line, making every mile driven feel like a gamble. Maria was initially hesitant about applying for a cardlock account but eventually took the plunge. Her skepticism soon gave way to relief. No more crumpled up receipts. Now there’s clear consolidated bills detailing every gallon pumped, by which driver and in which truck.

Benefits to help Maria’s bottom line came one by one, including most cost control, higher security, streamlined efficiency and greater convenience. But the most unexpected benefit was control. Maria could set spending limits for each driver, track routes in real-time, and even deactivate cards instantly if anything seemed amiss. This empowered her drivers, making them feel part of a responsible team, not just gas-guzzling liabilities. Maria, once consumed by spreadsheets and anxieties, finally had room to breathe and watch her trucks roar down the highway, fueled by efficiency and an extra touch of security.

Why businesses choose cardlock accounts for their operations. 

Fuel Cost Savings

  • Discounted fuel prices: Cardlock account holders often receive discounted fuel prices from participating fuel stations. These discounts can be based on factors such as fuel volume, account history, and payment terms.
     
  • Fuel usage tracking: Cardlock accounts provide detailed fuel usage data, which can help businesses identify areas where they can reduce fuel consumption. This data can be used to develop fuel-efficient driving practices and optimize fuel routing. 

Improved Fuel Management 

  • Individual driver tracking: Cardlock accounts allow businesses to track fuel usage by individual driver, which can help identify drivers who are using excessive amounts of fuel. This data can be used to provide targeted driver training and coaching.
  • Unauthorized fuel usage prevention: Cardlock accounts offer multiple security features, such as PIN numbers, purchase limits, and real-time transaction monitoring, which can help prevent unauthorized fuel usage.
  • Fuel routing optimization: Cardlock accounts can be used to identify the most cost-effective fuel stations for each vehicle, based on factors such as fuel price, location, and fuel quality. 

Reduced Fraud Risk 

  • PIN numbers: Cardlock accounts require drivers to enter a PIN number before fueling, which helps prevent unauthorized access to cards.
  • Purchase limits: Cardlock accounts can be set up with purchase limits, which can help prevent drivers from making excessive purchases.
  • Real-time transaction monitoring: Cardlock accounts provide real-time transaction monitoring, which allows businesses to identify suspicious activity immediately. 

Convenience and Efficiency 

  • 24/7 access: Cardlock stations are typically open 24/7, which allows businesses to refuel their vehicles at any time of day or night.
  • Automated payment: Cardlock accounts allow businesses to pay for fuel automatically, which eliminates the need for cash or credit card transactions.
  • Reduced downtime: Cardlock accounts can help reduce downtime by allowing businesses to refuel their vehicles quickly and efficiently. 

Enhanced Tax Compliance 

  • Detailed fuel usage records: Cardlock accounts provide detailed fuel usage records, which can be helpful for tax reporting and compliance purposes.
  • Automated tax reporting: Some cardlock account providers offer automated tax reporting services, which can help businesses save time and money. 

Contact Star Oilco to discuss opening a cardlock account to benefit your business operations and impact your bottom line in savings, security and efficiency. Already have an account? You can shop your fuel bill by allowing us to do a cost comparison to identify cost savings by switching today.  

JOIN THE FUEL MARKET REPORT NEWSLETTER FOR YOUR WEEKLY FILL OF UPDATES!

Name